Posts Tagged ‘Dagger’

The All Natural Trench Knife! Don’t mess with Mother Nature…

Sunday, September 25th, 2011

So let me pose a hypothetical question. IF you were given a choice of a weapon made of wood, and one made of steel, which one would you pick? I’m sure most of you would, without hesitation, pick the one made of steel. I, on the other hand, would be on the fence. Especially given that I tend to like things that are just… Cool. That’s not to say that wooden blades are entirely worthless, after all, you can do a lot of damage with a piece of wood, and even more if it has been sharpened and the edge hardened.

But what if it had teeth as well? Yeah… You heard me… A wooden knife. With a wicked set of teeth for a blade. Uh huh. Yeah… Now things get interesting… Imagine, if you will, an all natural fighting implement… Made entirely of natural materials, and edged with rows of razor-sharp shark teeth. Oh, but I’m not done yet. How about we throw in a spike. From a swordfish no less. Awwww Yeah… Now we’re talking…

Think about it. We are talking about the hand weapon equivalent of  a shark with a rapier attached to its snout. Certainly a laser attached to its head might be far more impressive, but with a spike, you’ll never have to replace the batteries. I’m just saying.  A spike is nothing to sneeze at. Take that and make a weapon out of it, and voilà! you have a personal, wooden hand shark. With a spike attached to its freakin’ head!

A fearsome weapon capable of horrific damage, but so stealthy that would not even set off metal detectors in an airport. Unless, of course you happened to use teeth from a shark that had somehow had the benefit of a modern dental plan, and had braces and amalgam fillings to boot. No, don’t laugh. It could happen. No, seriously. Go watch “Finding Nemo” and tell me that can’t happen. But I digress.

Today, I fawn over a very old but very cool all natural weapon of war called the Pahoa A’u Ku, also known as the Swordfish Bill Dagger. A combination of this:

A`u ku - Marlinspike Dagger

A`u ku - Marlinspike Dagger

And this:

Leiomano pahoa a`u

Leiomano pahoa a`u

 

To create this:

Pahoa A'u Ku - Marlinspike Leiomano Dagger

Pahoa A'u Ku - Marlinspike Leiomano Dagger

 

In case you didn’t quite catch just how much awesome I just laid on you up there, let me recap. The A`u ku is a dagger made from the spike of the broad bill Marlin a large fish with a very distinctive spike, much like a swordfish. Sometimes swordfish swords were used. The Leiomano pahoa a`u is a mêlée weapon, usually made of Koa wood, with a row of fairly wicked looking shark teeth affixed to the front edge of it.

Both weapons are relatively cool and awesome in their own right, but combine to produce the Pahoa A’u Ku, a weapon more awesome than the Decepticon Devastator! And all with materials straight from nature, in an almost unmodified form… WIN!

Proof, once again, that in spite of all the cool things we can do with steel nowadays, Mother nature was a total BAMF long before Chuck Norris and Samuel L. Jackson came along…

Yeah, I said it. Don’t hate. You know it’s true…

A`u ku -[Kumulau]
Pahoa A’u Ku – [Kumulau]
Leiomano pahoa a`u – [My Armory]

The Black Widow Strikes Again…

Wednesday, November 18th, 2009

Now I could have sworn I had already put together a post for this blade, however my (admittedly hasty) searches seems to turn up nothing. So I thought I’d go ahead and post about this interesting little knife, duplicate post or not!!! Allow me to introduce the Widow Queen.

Widow Queen

Widow Queen

It should be fairly obvious where the name of this blade came from, but for the entomological neophytes among you, the spider whose front legs are oh, so possessively surrounding the hilt of this dagger is, in fact, meant to be a female Black Widow Spider, most easily identified by the red hourglass shape on it’s abdomen.

The Black Widows is a highly venomous spider, and envenomation by female black widows has been known to kill humans. I’d be willing to bet that whoever designed this knife probably had a rather personal experience with one… 🙂 Now in in real life, of course, black widows tend to be black in color, however in this case, I think we can afford to make an exception. Especially since this particular variety of black widow would probably be a heckuvalot lot more deadly in the right hands.

Either way, I certainly like the black widow motif of this blade, even though I think it goes too far in several ways. For instance, do we really need to have a full double sided hand guard (the widows front legs) and a cross guard on the same blade? I would rather have just had the cross guard, and even that is a little overly ornate for my taste.

The same goes for the pommel. You have the little spider limb thing going on, *and* a spike. What’s up with that? In fact, now that i look at it, this dagger would have been just fine entirely without the spider. A simple spiked pommel, the cool black ridged grip, a simpler, not so spikey cross guard, and that absolutly beautiful blade…

Yes… The blade on this thing is the main reason why I really like it. Now don’t get me wrong, the Black Widow was excellently done, and i could see them making replicas of that all by itself, sans the dagger. But for me, the blade is where it’s at on this knife. The swell of the ricasso, the smooth sweep into that almost straight blade, narrowing smoothly down into an absolutely evil point… I just love that profile.

Sometimes I wonder whether the people who design things like this actually realize how beautiful the blades are, all by themselves. No need for themes, motifs, spiders scorpions and whatnot, even though they can sometimes be cool. Because even if this had been a simple dagger, just this blade, a simple cross guard, black smooth grip, maybe with a simpler point on the pommel, it would still have ended up on this page.

Or maybe marketing has no clue… Who knows.

Either way, it’s a real pity…

Widow Queen – [The Collectors Edge]

Twin Spinning Points of Doom… :D

Friday, November 6th, 2009

A while back, there was an interesting discussion on the Exotic Automatic Forums (http://exoticautomatic.com) about a rather cool weapon, or set of weapons, called Emeici or Emei Piercers (aka Emei Daggers). they are basically a set of steel rods, with sharp broadhead-like points on each end and a finger ring on a pivot attached at the center. Looky here:

Emei Piercers

Emei Piercers

Emeici are a traditional Chinese martial arts weapon, most notably practiced in Wu-Shu. The primary purpose of these weapons is obviously to speedily inflict deep puncture wounds, and in that regard, they are excellently designed.  The rods are of an extremely efficient design, in my opinion, very strong, but still extremely light and quick. I cannot fault that aspects of the design.

I’ve known of these weapons for a long time, and between the mechanical aspects of it’s design, and the rather visually impressive techniques typically used when wielding them, I cannot, argue they aren’t really, really cool. However in typical DarkBlader fashion, I cannot help but ask myself… What percentage of this kind of this “second kind” of cool is actually useful?

I have a lot of respect of traditional martial arts, the vast majority of my experience has been in TMAs, and so I see value in many of the traditional ways of doing things. *However* I have always found TMAs to have a rather unfortunate tendency towards the retention of outdated techniques and ideologies, and this weapon seems to be no exception.

[pro-player width=’320′ height=’240′ type=’video’]http://thedarkblade.com/wp-content/uploads/emeici.mp4[/pro-player]

Besides the obvious snafu of having an overenthusiastic martial artist pretty much admitting, on a nationally syndicated television series, that he is prone to the colloquial *bloodrage*, 😀  my point of contention is this: Does allowing the weapon to spin actually add any useful value to the use of the weapon besides the cool or intimidation factor? Or is it just for show?

If you ask a TMA what the practical benefits of being able to spin emeici around are, they will tell you it is helpful for confusing your opponent. They will argue that it allows quick switch ups, changes in direction, etc. And to some degree, this is true of most knives. The grip, the position of the edge or edges, the orientation of the point, etc. tell you things about how and where your opponent might strike.

But while the quick change-up explanation has merit, there are really only two grips that you can use with a set of emeici, between which you can perform any strike, to any target. So while this all sounds good in theory, I wouldn’t be looking predominantly at the position of the weapon to try and figure out where the next attack was going.

For spinning, double-ended stabbing weapons, since the spinning, by itself, does not really change any of those factors, methinks it would not matter so much. I don’t think I would be any more confused by the spinning than if it were being held still. I have yet to spar an Emeici wielding opponent, so my analysis may turn out to be entirely wrong, but…

What do you think? Anyone feel like weighing in on this one? Spinning Emeici: Mostly Show? Or Absolutely Go?

Emeici – [Chinatown Shop]

The DIY Dagger…

Friday, October 9th, 2009

Alright, so this dagger is decidedly *not* a DIY job, but it very well could be:

Pipe Knife Dagger

Pipe Knife Dagger

Technically, this is not a knife, but purely a dagger, as the design is one that is best suited for thrusting, and not much else. However if you had the right tools, this kind of weapon would be dirt cheap to make. You start if with a few basic ingredients, a section of steel pipe, a couple of nuts and bolts, a replacement rubber walking stick foot, a hacksaw, a drill, and a sharpening stone or grinder, mix them all together thoroughly, throw in  a healthy quantity of  elbow grease, and voila! you have a pipe dagger.

OK… that didn’t sound as simple as I thought it would. So don’t go trying this at home. But you get the idea. Actually when I first laid eyes on it I thought it was some sort of cheap, mass produced bayonet. Hey, don’t laugh…  Wouldn’t be the first time some poor infantry unit got cheap equipment… :/

Pipe Knife Dagger – [eBladeStore]

Holy Holey Knives Batman!

Wednesday, October 7th, 2009

Today I ran across a couple of interesting knives from South African knife maker Herbst. To be honest, these are not really my kind of blade, however I thought they represented a rather interesting perspective on the idea of patterning the full blade of the knife…

Except, in this case, doing so through and through… Hard to explain, so here, let me just show you:

Big Five Bowie - 1 of 3

Big Five Bowie - 1 of 3

Allow me to present the “Big Five” bowie. A rather beautiful bowie, I might add, though I am personally not too fond of the idea of carving a perfectly good blade through in the name of aesthetics. However, as the name suggests, the blade is “engraved”, (for lack of a better word), with the silhouette of 5 big game animals. An elephant, a rhino, a buffalo, a lion, and another big cat or possibly other animal, that I cannot readily identify.

Big Five Bowie - 2 of 3

Big Five Bowie - 2 of 3

Certainly excellent work, if not for the little red flags that are going up in my head on account of the large gaping holes in the blade. And I will certainly admit to it poossibly just me being mechanically excessively anal retentive. But I have never claimed to be normal, so HAH! is all I have to say about that.

Big Five Bowie - 3 of 3

Big Five Bowie - 3 of 3

Here’s another one, perhaps mechanically more sound, (yes, yes, I know I am probably the only one who is thinking abou that, but I just can’t help it so leave me be!!! 😛 )  but really not my type:

Carved Damascus - Pic 1

Carved Damascus - Pic 1

Now I do like the curves of the blade on this knife, it’s just the flourishes in the blade are a bit much for me…

Carved Damascus - Pic 2

Carved Damascus - Pic 2

See what I mean? It is still beautiful work, it just that those particular aesthetic look more to me like it belongs on a wrought iron gate, not *in* the blade of a knife.

Carved Damascus - Pic 3

Carved Damascus - Pic 3

Still, they are all quite amazing, the real pity is that when I look at this knife, images of flowers and vines keep popping into my head, totally obliterating any possible chance at making some truly nice lines become evil. Yeah… And the green grip does not help dispel these images in any way, shape or form.

Which, as  those of you who know will know, is one of my most heavily ranked internal grading criteria for how cool the aesthetics of a blade are. As you can probably guess, even though the craftsmanship of this blade is superb, this knife did not rank all that high on my scale.

Hey, what can I say? Nobody’s perfect…  At least I was able to work through my hangups enough to share it with you. lol…

Yeah, you’re welcome. 😀

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