Archive for the ‘Automatic’ Category

IT’S 2010? ALREADY!?! WELL HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

Friday, January 1st, 2010

Wow… It’s 2010 folks… 2010!

2009ย  just flew away… And didn’t even look back.I, for one, would like to thank the thousands of you that read this blog on a daily basis, believe me, I never thought I was writing anything that interesting. Well at least not to anyone but me… ๐Ÿ˜€ But I can’t say it hasn’t been rewarding. And to my regulars, I say Domo Arigatou Gozaimasu. Thank you very much! I will do my level best to continue to keep you all entertained in 2010!

And 2010 looks like it will be an auspicious year. It’s a nice round number, for one thing. And It has a movie named after it… though somehow I doubt the events in the movie will actually occur in real life… ๐Ÿ˜€ But either way, I think this is going to be an amazing year… I can just feel it in my smoldering bones. I’ve got some interesting projects planned, and I think you will all like them.

This will be the year of really, really, cool stuff. And I leave you with one such piece of cool to contemplate:

The Sword Gun

The Sword Gun

Awesome to 2010 and BEYOND!!!

Best wishes for the new year, from me, your perpetually fiery host, from the Realm of the Dark Blade! ๐Ÿ˜€

~Phyreblade~

Bladed Dogfaced Knuckle Dusters…

Wednesday, October 21st, 2009

A while back I happened to run into a rather cool little weapon on our forum, Exotic Automatic (http://exoticautomatic.com). Thought today would be a good day to share…

Rob Dalton's Dogface

Rob Dalton's Dogface

I present to you the Dogface, by Rob Dalton. And an amazing piece of work, I might add. An OTF blade, attached to a unique grip, with integrated finger holes, and some rather evil looking spikes on the top to as well. Just wicked all around.

But the really cool thing I like about this blade is that, depending on how you look at it, it could be a combination of several different weapon designs all mashed into one. Can you guess what they are? Let’s play a little “Where’s Weapon Waldo…” ๐Ÿ™‚

Dalton's Dogface OTF

Dalton's Dogface OTF

The first one should be obvious. It’s an OTF, or “out-the-front” automatic switchblade. It’s a fairly simple blade design, nothing too fancy, but certainly a nice design. OTFs are always cool. What you see next really depends on what kinds of weapons you prefer.

If you are the brawler type, you might see a knuckle duster and a pocket knife. If, on the other hand, you are the knife fighter, you might see a WWII trench styled knife, which combined the knuckle duster design with a fixed blade. Yet another knife design I’ve always liked. It’s all about the options…

Dalton's Dogface - Stainless Steel Finish

Dalton's Dogface - Stainless Steel Finish

Either way, this blade is just way freakin’ cool…

Rob Dalton’s Dogface OTF – [The Knife Auction]

A Beautiful Blade of Mixed Heritage…

Monday, September 7th, 2009

Today is a good day. Sinza, a buddy of mine, who started the Exotic Automatic forums we run, (http://exoticautomatic.com Go check it out!!) ran into a very interesting blade, and was kind enough to give me a heads up! And I gotta tell ya, this is an exotic beauty of a blade. Born of classic knife blood. My kind of heritage… Yeah… ๐Ÿ˜€

Allow me to introduce you to a unique stiletto from Burn Knives. A stiletto of mixed blood. African, Asian, and European. They call it an 11″ Italian picklock stiletto in random patterned damascus with a hollow ground tanto blade. *I* call her Aidemona. For reasons which may not be obvious right now. But I assure you, I will explain. And here she is:

Aidemona - 11" Italian Picklock Stilletto, Damascus steel, Tanto Blade

Aidemona - 11" Italian Picklock Stilletto, Damascus steel, Tanto Blade

Isn’t she beautiful? I have always been a fan of stilettos. Beautiful, narrow, usually single edged blades, automatics with will of their own, an a undeniable presence. And this one, while a major departure from traditional stiletto design, is all the more attractive to me for it’s differences. Such sweet differences… OK… I guess I ought to stop marveling at her beauty and introduce her properly. Meet Aidemona.

Aidemona - Left Side

Aidemona - Left Side

Aidemona - Bolster, Guard

Aidemona - Bolster, Guard

I call this knife Aidemona in homage to several characters from Shakespearian literature. Specifically the tragic work, Othello. In it, we have the Venetian beauty Desdemona, who falls in love, and elopes with Othello, a moor, a man of color. In my mind I imagine that if they had a daughter, she would have been called Demona. A child of mixed Italian and African blood. A stiletto in dark damascus steel.

Aidemona - Right Side

Aidemona - Right Side

Aidemona - Liner filework

Aidemona - Liner filework

But Aidemona is yet so much more than that. What if Demona had traveled to Asia, and hooked up with a Japanese man? A Samurai of noble blood? What would their daughter look like? Well, this is who I imagine Aidemona to be. An strong, exotic beauty with a proud Italian stiletto heritage, a Japanese blade, and beautiful dark damascus skin… A melding of cultures so far apart, into something… breathtaking.

Aidemona - Blade

Aidemona - Blade

Aidemona - Blade, Right Side, Point

Aidemona - Blade, Right Side, Point

Perhaps I am biased. I have always loved tanto blades. Their strong, utilitarian lines, and the pure strength of that point design. I have also always loved automatics. And what type of blade is more deserving to be the proud ambassador of automatic knives than the Italian Stiletto? I can’t think of any better. And of course, I love dark knives. Dark blued steel, patterned damascus, they look better to me than the million other shiny flashy blades out there. So you can probably imagine how knives like Aidemona make me feel.

Aidemona - Spine filework

Aidemona - Spine filework

Aidemona - Pommel filework

Aidemona - Pommel filework

And just look at the fit and finish on this blade. Sweet, jet black onyx stone scales, the intricate file work along the spine, liners and pommel of the grip, the skull safety, and the mother of pearl button… A functional, beautiful but, oh, so evil looking work work of art. I love it. I would propose to her, except I have so many girlfriends now, I think it would surely mean my demise…

Aidemona - Mother of Pearl Button, Skull Safety

Aidemona - Mother of Pearl Button, Skull Safety

Aidemona - Closed - Right Side

Aidemona - Closed - Right Side

I think I’m going to just go back and spend the rest of the day just drooling over her from afar…

11″ Italian Picklock Stiletto, Tanto Blade, Black Damascus – [Burn Knives]

The work of a master blade wrangler…

Friday, July 27th, 2007

A while back, one of my readers (Thanks Jon!) clued me in on a custom knife maker out of Montana by the name of Harkins. Jeffery A. Harkins. Please allow me the honor to present the work of Mr. Harkins, grand master of switchblade husbandry:

J. A. Harkins Designer OTF Switblades

J. A. Harkins Designer OTF Switblades

My two favorite Harkins knife styles are featured in the pic above, and are called the Triton, and the “Q”. These are both DA (Double Action) OTF switchblade designs, though they each feature different switch location points. The Triton features a switch on the flat side of the blade enclosure, while the “Q” features an edge mounted switch. Both are awesome. In fact pretty much every knife on the site, even the plain ones, are simply outstanding. In every way. Except for the cost of course. But you couldn’t expect any different. This level of quality ain’t supposed to be cheap.

J.A. Harkins "Q" OTF - Tortoise Design

J.A. Harkins "Q" OTF - Tortoise

Now me personally, I think Harkins makes some of the most exceptionally beautiful knives I have ever seen. While there is certainly no shortage of excellent custom knife designers, many of the designers whose weapons I have blogged about on this site so far have made a name for themselves by designing strange, futuristic, unusual or even outlandish weapons, which, while cool, are not exactly practical, or even functional.

J.A. Harkins "Triton" - Blackwork Design

J.A. Harkins "Triton" - Blackwork

What sets Jeffery Harkins apart is not only the beautiful aesthetics, high quality fit and finish, and general overall attention to detail of each knife, but the fact that all of his knives appear to be constructed to withstand the rigors of daily use, just like any regular folding pocket knife. Not that I would subject such any of these knives to such a life. No, that would be blasphemous. This is art. Functional art, but art nonetheless. No, really. I honestly don’t think I could bring myself to blemish one of these blades.

J.A. Harkins "Triton" - Ebony

J.A. Harkins "Triton" - Ebony

OK, fine, mock me if you will, but go to his site and see for your own eyes what I’m talking about. Just a little warning. If you are a knife fanatic like I am, you will need something to wipe up the drool from your keyboard as you browse…

The Triton & “Q” custom switchblade – [J. A. Harkins]

Eureka! Kold Fuzhion!

Tuesday, July 17th, 2007

LOL, Alright. So I’m not talking about cold fusion, as in, I haven’t figured out how to get a nuclear reactor to operate at room temperature. That would have been a perfect excuse to explain my lack of posts for the last few days. And would be the first step in a super secret plan I have to build a super computer that could play games like Halo 2, Half-Life 2 , F.E.A.R., Far Cry and Battlefield 2142 at super high resolution in a totally immersive environment. Basically an environmentally controlled room where each wall is just a huge monitor screen and…

OK it’s supposed to be secret so I cant say anymore otherwise i will have to put a contract out on your heads. So I’m not going to try to explain at all. So there. Deal. Humph. But back to the topic at hand. I was actually talking about an interesting blade by Tom Anderson.

Kold Fuzhion by Tom Anderson

Kold Fuzhion by Tom Anderson

Now this weapon caught my eye for two reasons. First it is a beautiful knife. I love the waspy shape and the beautiful lines of the handle. And the two retractable edged guards certainly add to the wicked look of the knife. Overall it’s just the kind of design i like. Organic and subtle.

But the second reason should be immediately apparent any Star Trek fans among you. This knife has an uncanny resemblance in both form and operation to a Klingon weapon called the d’k tahg (or daqtagh) most notable for being used to kill Captain James Tiberias Kirk‘s son during the third Star Trek movie (The Search for Spock).

Klingon D'k Tahg

Klingon D'k Tahg

As you can see there is a strong resemblance. About the only difference is that the original Klingon weapon employs straight lines, and a hollow fuller of sorts, whereas Tom Andersons version incorporates a lot of curves and holes in the blade. In my humble opinion, though this may sound like blasphemy to any hard core ‘trek fan, I must say I prefer the Anderson blade over the original. However in my defense, I have generally always had an affinity for curves over straight lines…

Tom Anderson Kold Fuzhion Double Edge – [True Swords]

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