Today I thought I’d post about a rather interesting weapon. A spike. But not just any spike, A spike with an interesting history…

Death Blow Spike

Death Blow Spike

Now on the site I found this on, called it a death blow spike, and featured a spike with an interesting design, namely a spike with a flattened grip, with a Samurai cast on top of the flat part of the grip, with a funny little nub on top, and on a band around the wooden case that it comes in.

It also comes with three darts, for reasons I cannot fathom; but of interest to us today, is the spike. Yes, it would indeed be a great little weapon, easy to hide, quick to deploy, etc. BUT then you have to ask yourself, if this was intended to be another easily accessible hidden weapon, why the case?

A case would only make it larger, and more obvious, and it would add another step when you want to wield it. And for that matter, why the adornment on the spike? Most weapons like these were rarely ever so aesthetically well endowed. What gives? Well… And I think I know.

I kept thinking to myself, I have seen that design before. At first I was thinking it might be some form of, bo shuriken, but though it could easily be used as such, bo shuriken do not usually have that unusual shape to the butt, nor are they so ornately decorated…

Then it hit me: A Kubizashi. Had to be. Kubizashi were a rather interesting… Tool… (for lack of a better word.) Kubizashi were used by Samurai, during war, to shall we say… “Mark” the heads of their beheaded trophy foes on the battlefield. Yeah.

And by “Mark”, I mean these kubizashi were thrust into the bodyless head, and a tassel, with the name of the Samurai that had relieved the unfortunate combatant of his noggin, was tied around the little stub at the top of the weapon…

After the battle they could go back across the field and perform a “head count” as it were, (it is wrong that am rolling in my chair at the moment?) 😮 of the number of enemies beheaded by each Samurai. If memory serves they also looked at the faces of the beheaded as these were interpreted as good or bad omens…

Yep… Those Medieval Japanese sure were fairly practical folk. And they really knew how to make really nice “tools”… 🙂

Death Blow Spike – [eBladeStore]