If you are a fan of the X-Men comic book series, saturday morning cartoons or movies, you’ll probably be aware of the kind of cool things that a mutant can do. Obviously this isn’t a comic book blog, so no, I’m not posting about X-Men. Unless one of them happens to have a cool sword that some knife designer decides to produce.

However what if you could have mutant weapons? Well that would be a whole new ball game wouldn’t it. And when I saw this weapon, “It’s a Mutant!” was the first thing that sprang to mind:

Fantasy Dual Swords

fantasy Dual Swords
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Yup, yup. It’s a mutant. Trust me. What was it before it’s x-gene was activated? I’ll tell you. It was a Khukuri. What’s a Khukuri? Ah, well let’s take a trip into the history of British Nepal and India. The Khukuri is a traditional knife used by the Gurkhas of Nepal and Northern India. The Gurkhas were recruited by the british army for their bravery, resilience and strength, and each Gurkha soldier carried with him a Khukuri knife. Eventually this unique knife became known as the Gurkha knife, aka the Gurkha Khukuri.

A Gurkha Khukuri

A Gurkha Kukri

Above is a traditional Gurkha Khukuri. If you ever watched WaterWorld with Kevin Costner, who played the role of the Mariner, (who was coincidentally, also a mutant), this is the knife he used to dispatch a rather unruly seafarer during the movie.

Now the Khukuri above has been polished to a mirror shine, which is not typical. But I”ll bet you can see a resemblance to it’s mutant form? See it? Huh? I thought so. Now given that the Khukuri is a fairly lethal weapon in it’s own right, it makes all kind of sense for there knife makers to produce several variants of this blade design, some of which I will probably blog about in the near future. However, this fantasy design really caught my eye.

As you can see, this mutant Khukuri carries the basic shape of a Khukuri, with several modifications. It is longer, with a narrower blade with in proportion to the original. The fantasy design also eschews a wood or horn grip for a full tang cord wrap. Also there is a divot in the spine of the mutant with a short connecting bar, also sporting a cord wrap. This I’m not too happy with, as it introduces a structural weakness into the blade that is really unnecessary. But that is my only major gripe.

The fine point sweeps down to a rearward hook just before the aforementioned divot, which is a nice touch. And the cord wrapped handle and integrated finger guard is equally interesting, conforming to a mild s-shape, probably intended to perform the same function as the sharp, 20-degree dogleg in the blade of the original Khukuri was designed for, which is to make the chopping edge meet the target as flat as possible without the need to bend the wrist. This makes for a much more powerful chopping stroke. In addition to this, the fine point and s-shaped grip could actually allow this to be used as a decent stabbing weapon, which is an ability that the original Khukuri was severely lacking.

From an aesthetic stand point, this design makes for a very futuristic looking Khukuri. A Khukuri that is an advanced evolution of the original. Hence, I have dubbed it “The Mutant Khukuri”. Regardless of what anyone else calls it, it will always be a cool “Mutant Khukuri” to me…

Mutant Khukuri (Fantasy Dual Swords) – [Collectors Edge]